Sleep and insulin sensitivity in adolescents at risk of type 2 diabetes: the Sleep Manipulation in Adolescents at Risk of Type 2 Diabetes randomized crossover study (2024)

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Volume 47 Issue 5 May 2024
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Caroline Dutil

Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Research Institute

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

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Irina Podinic

Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Research Institute

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

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Ryan B Featherstone

Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Research Institute

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

Centre for Healthy Active Living (CHAL), Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO)

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

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Amelia Eaton

Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Research Institute

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

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Christin M Sadler

Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Research Institute

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

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Gary S Goldfield

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Stasia Hadjiyannakis

Centre for Healthy Active Living (CHAL), Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO)

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

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Reut Gruber

Department of Psychiatry, McGill University

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Montreal, QC

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Canada

Attention, Behaviour and Sleep Lab, Douglas Mental Health University Institute

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Montreal, QC

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Canada

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Mark S Tremblay

Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Research Institute

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

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Denis Prud’homme

School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa

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Ottawa, ON

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Université de Moncton

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Moncton, NB

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Canada

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Jean-Philippe Chaput

Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Research Institute

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Ottawa, ON

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Canada

School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa

,

Ottawa, ON

,

Canada

School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa

,

Ottawa, ON

,

Canada

Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa

,

Ottawa, ON

,

Canada

Corresponding author. Jean-Philippe Chaput, Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada, K1H 8L1. Email: jpchaput@cheo.on.ca.

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Sleep, Volume 47, Issue 5, May 2024, zsad313, https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsad313

Published:

09 December 2023

Article history

Received:

13 June 2023

Revision received:

01 November 2023

Published:

09 December 2023

Corrected and typeset:

23 December 2023

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    Caroline Dutil, Irina Podinic, Ryan B Featherstone, Amelia Eaton, Christin M Sadler, Gary S Goldfield, Stasia Hadjiyannakis, Reut Gruber, Mark S Tremblay, Denis Prud’homme, Jean-Philippe Chaput, Sleep and insulin sensitivity in adolescents at risk of type 2 diabetes: the Sleep Manipulation in Adolescents at Risk of Type 2 Diabetes randomized crossover study, Sleep, Volume 47, Issue 5, May 2024, zsad313, https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsad313

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Abstract

Study Objectives

To investigate the effect of increasing sleep duration for 1 week, compared to a week of habitual and decreased sleep, on insulin sensitivity (IS) in adolescents at risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D).

Methods

Adolescents, 13–18 years old, at risk for T2D, with obesity and other risk factors, were recruited for a randomized (1:1), open-label, sex-stratified crossover study, that manipulated time-in-bed to modify sleep duration (measured by actigraphy). Following a week of habitual (HB) sleep, time-in-bed was increased (IN) and decreased (DE) by 1 hour 30 min/night for 1 week, counterbalanced across participants (HBINDE or HBDEIN), and separated by a week of washout sleep. The main outcome measure was IS, obtained via 2-hour oral-glucose-tolerance-test conducted after each sleep week.

Results

Of the 43 participants recruited, 36 (84%) completed all sleep interventions (52.8% female, age = 15.1 years, body mass index = 99.9th percentile, order: HBINDE = 18 and HBDEIN = 18). On average, during the HB week, participants slept 7 hours 31 min/night; sleep duration was 1 hour 02 min/night higher during the IN week and 1 hour 19 min/night lower during the DE week. We found a significant effect of sleep week on IS with a large effect size. Following the IN sleep week, IS was 20% higher compared to after the HB and DE sleep weeks, but there was no significant difference in IS following HB versus DE sleep weeks.

Conclusions

Whenever possible, clinicians should empower youth at risk of T2D to improve their sleep duration, since even a modest increase in sleep duration of 1 h/night for 1 week can have a positive impact on IS in this population.

Clinical Trials

Sleep Extension and IS in Adolescents, https://clinicaltrials.gov/study/NCT03754036, November 23rd, 2018.

Trial registration

ClinicalTrials.gov (ID:NCT03754036).

Graphical Abstract

Sleep and insulin sensitivity in adolescents at risk of type 2 diabetes: the Sleep Manipulation in Adolescents at Risk of Type 2 Diabetes randomized crossover study (4)

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adolescents, experimental study, insulin resistance, insulin sensitivity, obesity, sleep duration, sleep manipulation, type 2 diabetes

© The Author(s) 2023. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For commercial re-use, please contact reprints@oup.com for reprints and translation rights for reprints. All other permissions can be obtained through our RightsLink service via the Permissions link on the article page on our site—for further information please contact journals.permissions@oup.com.

This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/pages/standard-publication-reuse-rights)

Topic:

  • obesity
  • diabetes mellitus, type 2
  • adolescent
  • sleep
  • insulin sensitivity
  • sleep duration

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